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Mortgages: What Happens After You Pass Away. | Fort Wayne Will and Trust Lawyer

Posted by April Grunden | Oct 29, 2020 | 0 Comments

Estate plans usually concern who will get what, like money, jewelry, the house, and family heirlooms after a person dies. Little thought, though, is given to what will happen to debts when they die; most importantly, the mortgage.

Many people expect to pay off their mortgage long before they pass away, but the current financial landscape paints a much different picture. As seniors live longer and longer, they are often forced to take out second mortgages and home equity loans to cover the cost of basic living expenses. So what happens to that mortgage after they die?

The simple answer to that question is that the mortgage stays with the property, which means that it becomes the responsibility of whoever inherits the property. Complications may arise when the time comes to determine how the mortgage will be paid off. Here's what you can expect to happen if you have a mortgage on your house at the time you pass away:

The money from your estate is used to pay the mortgage. Paying off the mortgage through the estate is the best option, but it only occurs through careful legal and financial planning. The estate must have enough assets to cover the debt, which may leave your beneficiaries with less cash but also a house that is owned outright. In order for this to happen, you should make a provision in your Last Will and Testament or Revocable Trust to have the mortgage paid with estate or trust assets. It is recommended that you consult with an experienced Fort Wayne will and trust lawyer to see if this option is a possibility for you.

Your beneficiaries pay the mortgage. Another, more complicated, route is having your beneficiaries pay the mortgage. In some cases, your beneficiaries could refinance to get a better interest rate on the mortgage. However, if they already have a mortgage on their own home, they could be forced to sell either their home or the inherited home to pay off the mortgage.

Sometimes, though, the property is worth less than the value of the mortgage. A lender could agree to a short sale, which means the home would be sold for less than the value of the debt, but the estate would not be held liable for the difference or loss.

It is important to review your current situation with an experienced Fort Wayne will and trust lawyer before you make any decisions concerning your estate plan. If you have any questions about the role your mortgage can play in your estate plan, please contact us at (260) 969-1177 or click here to set up an initial consultation.

About the Author

April Grunden

I am the anti-attorney.  I buck the system at every turn because I believe the system is broken.  I have seen the old way of dictating to families and business owners how their plans should work.  I've seen how attorneys run roughshod over clients. Enough is enough. I want to protect my family. ...

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